Copenhagen chemist to meet Nobel giants – University of Copenhagen

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03 May 2013

Copenhagen chemist to meet Nobel giants

Nobel event

A young University of Copenhagen chemist has managed to find his way into a very select crowd. PhD student Kasper Steen Pedersen is one of only two Danes chosen to represent Denmark at the “63rd Lindau Nobel Meeting on Chemistry”

Every five years, more than 20,000 chemists from 78 countries vie for the chance to attend the event. This year, 625 have been selected to attend the event in Lindau on the Bodensee, Germany. Here they will, with 37 Nobel laureate chemists, discuss the future of chemistry, exchange knowledge and ideas, establish new partnerships and so forth.

Discussing the future of Chemistry

Kasper Pedersen, who conducts research into molecular magnetism and inorganic chemistry, will in part discuss his own research, but also discuss chemistry research within in a far broader context, including how chemistry might, will or should affect humanity.

"We should be able to influence the tone of chemistry sciences for the immediate future

Kasper Steen Pedersen

PhD student, Dept of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen

”It’s simple enough to present one’s own research. But addressing a wider perspective immediately provokes anxiety. But, as there are both Nobel laureates as well as the most talented young chemists among the participants, we should be able to influence the tone of chemistry sciences for the immediate future,” believes Kasper Steen Pedersen.

Fruitfull meetings with like minds

In particular, Pedersen looks forward to the other participants’ combined representation of chemistry in the broadest sense. He hopes this will inspire him to venture down new paths in his own research.

”I am sure that there are opportunities that one would never imagine from within one’s own little bubble. This can serve as an eye-opener to other fields,” concludes the 26 –year-old Copenhagen chemist.

Find out more about the event at www.lindau-nobel.org