New report details broad base of chemistry jobs – University of Copenhagen

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01 December 2015

New report details broad base of chemistry jobs

Chemistry jobs

A wide range of career opportunity awaits UCPH chemistry students once their graduate degree is in hand. This was shown by a study conducted by the Department of Chemistry’s Head of Studies, Solveig Jørgensen. The study matched a list of graduates from 2005-2015 with their Linkedin profiles. Of the eighty-seven percent of former students with Linkedin profiles, only 1 percent of them were unemployed.

Private sector, Public office and "The First Researcher Job": The PHD

Graduate job opportunities can be segmented into three similarly sized general groupings. One third of graduates are employed in the private sector, another in the public sector and a final third are continuing their research educations as PhDs.

Many work as "the lone chemist"

For graduates employed in the private sector, the variation was surprising, with fifty privately employed chemists working in 29 separate organisations: 13 at Novo Nordisk, seven at Haldor Topsoe, three at Leo Pharma, two at Lundbeck and a single chemist at Biogen, Bayer, Ferrosan, GEA, Mærsk, Novozymes, Nuevolution, Janssen, V-biotek, Thermo Fisher, Waters and Zealand Pharma.

Education largest task in public sector

In the public sector, high schools are by far the largest individual employment sector, with 17 graduates now working as teachers. The University of Copenhagen has employed 14, while foreign universities and other public sector employers have hired eight, seven at Aarhus University, four at DTU, two at DONG Energy, one at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment and one at the Danish Defence Research Establishment.

Solvejg Jørgensen presented a report of the study at the “Your first job as a chemist” event, which took place on Friday, November 20 at HCØ.